Singleton, NSW

Singleton is on New England Highway (A15)



Singleton Attractions

Apex Lookout

This lookout offers good views over the Hunter River flood plains. Facilities at the lookout include toilets, children's playground, rubbish bins and a large turning circle for caravans to park and turn around.

Turn west off the New England Highway at the northern entrance to Singleton, onto Maison Dieu Road (signposted to the Industrial area). Travel 1 kilometre then turn left onto Hambledon Hill Road. After 600 metres turn right onto Lookout Road where it is signposted to Apex Lookout.

Royal Australian Infantry Corps Museum

This Museum was established in 1911. It is housed within the Singleton Army Camp, 8 kilometres south of Singleton, and is open to the public. Guided tours are available for groups. The museum tells the story of the Infantry Soldier from colonial days through to current operations. Throughout the galleries and exhibitions the profile of the Australian Infantry Soldier is displayed with actual weapons, uniforms, equipment, maps, medals, pictures, stories, personal letters and videos, as used during these operations. Other significant exhibitions include a historical display of the Royal New South Wales Regiment and the Royal Australian Regiment. There is a picnic-barbecue area with light refreshments on offer and souvenirs for sale. Open: Wednesday to Sunday 9.00am-4.00pm (Closed Monday and Tuesday, Public Holidays and the whole month of November) There is a small admission charge.

From the north, turn right off the New England Highway, 5.5 kilometres south of the Hunter River which is at the northern end of Singleton onto Range Road. The museum is 4.5 kilometres on the right.

From the south, turn left off the New England Highway, 11 kilometres northwest of Branxton, onto the Golden Highway. Travel 6 kilometres, turn right onto Range Road and the museum is 350 metres on the left.

infantrymuseum.com.au

Sacred Spaces Convent

Set in spacious gardens creating a unique atmosphere of peace, this convent is the Motherhouse of the Sisters of Mercy. The gracious buildings date back to the mid nineteenth century, and display remarkable architectural beauty. Take a tour of the grounds and enjoy the uniquely peaceful historic Convent, Museum and Chapel all set in a stunning garden atmosphere. Do not underestimate this site. It will surprise and delight you. Conducted tours tell the story of the Sisters and the Convent and must be pre-booked.

From the north, veer left off the New England Highway at Singleton immediately after crossing the Hunter River. Follow this road around to the left then turn right at the T-intersection onto Queen Street. The convent is 450 metres on the left adjacent to St Patricks Church.

From the south, veer left off the New England Highway at the northern end of Singleton's CBD, onto Campbell Street. At the first roundabout turn right onto John Street. Follow this street under the highway for 800 metres and the convent is on the left adjacent to St Patricks Church.

www.sacredspaces.org.au

Singleton Historical Society Museum

This museum is housed in the old courthouse (c1841) which later became a municipal council building, was preceded by two lock up cells built on the site in 1840. The Society was granted the use of the building in 1963. The aim of the society is to preserve artefacts used by the Aboriginal inhabitants, European settlers and residents of the area for the appreciation of present and future generations. The museum reflects these aims through its displays and research activities. From an original horse drawn ambulance cart to furniture, farm machinery to kitchenware, the museum has something for everyone.

The museum is in Burdekin Park which is beside the New England Highway. 600 metres south of the Hunter River in Singleton on the western side of the highway.

www.singletonmuseum.com.au

Singleton Sundial

The sundial stands as a visible link between the old and the new, a modern work of art and an ancient method of time telling. It should get accolades for being both big and useful. It was the major feature of the 1988 Bicentennial Riverside Park Project. The sundial formed a gateway to the Hunter River with it’s picnic areas and recreational and sporting facilities. Construction of the Sundial was financed by contributions from the mining industry and community groups within and around Singleton. It is alleged that it is the biggest monolithic sundial in the Southern Hemisphere weighing in at 300 tonnes. It can be accessed at all times.

From the north, veer left off the New England Highway at Singleton immediately after crossing the Hunter River. Follow this road around to the left then turn left at the T-intersection onto Queen Street. Follow this street which becomes John Street for 700 metres then turn right at the traffic lights onto Ryan Avenue. The sundial is 800 metres on the right in Rose Point Park, opposite Woolworths Supermarket where there is plenty of parking.

From the south, veer left off the New England Highway at the northern end of Singleton onto Hunter Street (first left after 'KFC'). After 700 metres cross over John Street at the traffic lights onto Ryan Avenue and the sundial is 800 metres on the right in Rose Point Park, opposite Woolworths Supermarket where there is plenty of parking.

This page last reviewed on 1 Dec 2016